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Contract proof

A Contract Proof is a color-consistent and legally binding proof according to ISO 12647-7. The Contract Proof is currently the highest proof standard with the narrowest tolerances and is therefore considered a “contract”, i.e. a contract between the proof maker and the printing house.

The quality and performance of a proofing system can be checked and issued by Fogra, for example, with the “Contract Proof Creation” certificate. Companies that are certified by Fogra for the creation of contract proofs may use the FograCert logo. Using the certification number, it is easy to check on the Fogra website for which Proof Standard the certificate was issued and whether it is valid.

Since the certificate is associated with high costs and expires after only one year and must be recertified, many companies shy away from the costs and unfortunately advertise with certificates that are many years old.

Digital proofs

Digital proofs (correct: contract proofs) are an ISO-certified test equipment for the graphic arts industry. Digital proofs simulate the colourfulness of offset or gravure printing in a colour and legally binding manner within the narrow tolerances of ISO 12647-7. Today, they are almost exclusively calculated using a RIP and then produced with inkjet printers on special proof papers.

The proof data is converted into separations, then reassembled into a composite image to correctly simulate overprinting and trapping. The data is then transferred as a newly created composite image to an inkjet printer, usually with more than 8 colours, which prints the data. In addition to the print data, digital proofs must also carry a UGRA/Fogra media wedge in order to be colour-consistent and legally binding. Thanks to the standardised wedge, the printer is able to check the proof for correctness. Since many printing houses do not have this measuring technique at hand, the proof is often provided directly with a test report that shows the correctness of the measured values of the media wedge directly on the proof.

Earlier methods such as Chromalin etc. are no longer available on the market today.

In addition to the term “digital proofs”, terms such as colour proofs, proofs or online proofs are still in common use.

ISO 12647 defines the highest standard of contract proofs, or “proofs” (ISO 12647-7), as well as the term “validation prints” (ISO 12647-8). Validation Prints are characterised by the fact that although they are less accurate in colour, they can also be produced on laser printers. Compared to contract proofs, however, they accept much higher colour deviations and are only legally binding after prior consultation. Real “proofs”, i.e. true contract proofs according to ISO 12647-7 are currently not only by far the best variant in terms of colour but also the only legally binding proofs.

Further information:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prepress_proofing

Job ticket

Each colour and legally binding proof comes with a job ticket on which the most important frame data for the proof and data processing are listed. The job ticket is usually placed between the proof and the media wedge.

The job ticket must contain the following information (normative):

Contract Proof according to ISO 12647-7”
Name of the printing system (printer, software)
Designation of the colourants (inks)
Name of the substrate used
Identification of the pressure condition to be simulated
Date and time of proof creation
The colour profiles used, but at least the simulation profile used

The following information can also be included (optional):

Date and time of the last calibration (normative only for Validation Print)
Rendering Intents (is in 99% of the cases “absolutely colorimetric”)

Neben dem Fiery bzw. EFI Logo steht das sogenannte "Jobticket".
Next to the Fiery or EFI logo is the so-called “job ticket” of the proof.

Proof

What is a proof?

A proof (correct: contract proof) is an ISO-certified testing device for the graphic arts industry. A proof simulates the colourfulness of offset or gravure printing in a colour and legally binding manner within the narrow tolerances of ISO 12647-7. Today, it is almost exclusively calculated using a RIP and then produced with inkjet printers on special proof papers.

The proof data is converted into separations, then reassembled into a composite image to correctly simulate overprinting and trapping. The data is then transferred as a newly created composite image to an inkjet printer, usually with more than 8 colours, which prints the data. In addition to the print data, a proof must also carry a UGRA/Fogra media wedge in order to be colour-consistent and legally binding. Thanks to the standardised wedge, the printer is able to check the proof for correctness. Since many printing companies do not have this measuring technique at hand, the proof is often provided directly with a test report that shows the correctness of the measured values of the media wedge directly on the proof.

Earlier methods such as Chromalin etc. are no longer available on the market today.

In addition to the term “proof”, terms such as colour proof or digital proof are also commonly used.

ISO 12647 defines the term “Validation Print” (ISO 12647-8) in addition to the highest standard of contract proof, “Proof” (ISO 12647-7). The Validation Print is characterized by the fact that although it is less accurate in colour, it can also be produced on laser printers. Compared to the contract proof, however, it accepts much higher colour deviations and is only legally binding after prior consultation. A real “proof”, i.e. a real contract proof according to ISO 12647-7 is currently not only by far the best variant in terms of colour, but also the only legally binding proof.

Further information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prepress_proofing

 

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