Affordable Proof Shipping, now worldwide.

 

Proof GmbH has now even more attractive shipping terms for domestic and international shipping. In addition, proofs can now be sent via Express and standard shipping worldwide.

Throughout Germany shipping costs for packages from Proof A3 were reduced to only 9,-€.

In international shipping, costs were partially reduced by almost 50%. Proofs can now be sent quickly and conveniently wordwide. shipping costs and options are directly calculated in the shop so that a quick and direct proof order is possible. Express delivery in the EU is now from 35, – €, Switzerland and the United States from only 45, – €. Even for Afghanistan and Nigeria, shipping costs for DIN A0 proofs are only 75, – €.  In international express, delivery time is between one to four days…

The exact prices and per country can be seen here:

Countries and shipping cost for proofing on shop.proof.de

Please note: Express delivery and standard delivery to countries in located in different shipping zones. So the standard shipping in the US through DHL is nearly as “expensive”, as the express delivery. So express delivery for only 10 Euro more certainly is the more attractive option for time-critical goods such proofs.

Fogra Fogra 51 and 52: No Start in sight.

 

Fogra Fogra 51 and 52, optical brighteners and the new standards for offset printing and proofing are currently on everyone’s lips. In the proof area we still see only announcements and beta versions, but no real solutionsby now. In 2013 the reorganization of ISO 12647-2 was adopted for offset printing, but according to ECI the earliest “expected recommendation on the implementation of the new ISO 12647-2 as well as the provision of appropriate handouts and instruments’ will be in 2015. The current status of Fogra 51 and Fogra 52 from our perspective:

Color profiles:

  • Fogra Fogra 51 and 52 have completed the beta phase at the Fogra in May 2014 and were forwarded to the ECI. The there in the project “fred15” compiled information and downloads are but from March, July to October 2014, but since then there has been no more news on the new standards. So there is currently no date for the release of the final profiles, handouts and tools foreseeable. Fogra, ECI, bvdm and UGRA continue to work together on the new standards.

Proof Papers:

ONE Technologies: The proofing paper for Fogra 51, already announced in May is still not available today.

ONE Technologies: The proofing paper for Fogra 51, already announced in May is still not available today.

  • ONE Technologies announced in May 2014, the certified proofing paper “ONE Proof Paper 51 SATIN” on … that in November is not yet available anywhere.
  • GMG announced in October, the proofing paper “GMG Proof semimatte 250 OBA”, which to this day is also available anywhere.
  • Also working on new  proofing substrates is EFI, but naming, pricing and release dates are not known.

Measuring technology:

  • Epson announced in August to deliver from 1 September 2014 all Epson SpectroProofer measuring devices with the new measuring head ILS 30 only. Unfortunately, the new SpectroProofer is not yet commercially available as an accessory.
  • While all previous sources reported that the new SpectroProofer –  Although Fogra 51 and 52, ie M1 and M2 capable, can not measure ISOcoatedv2 or M0. EFI with Fiery XF 6.1 and the SpectroProofer ILS 30 support all measurement modes, ie Fogra 51 and 52 and ISOcoatedv2 simultaneously … unfortunately is neither Fiery XF 6.1. previously available nor the SpectroProofer … but according to EFI they are currently testing all 3 modes … M0, M1 and M2 with the new SpectroProofer … that sounds promising. Continue reading

Is a proof possible on special paper such as publication paper?

 

“We print 135gr/sqm on a Berberich Allegro. Can you make us a proof on this paper? Can you proof on our final publication paper?”

Our telephone support often asks for a proof on publication paper. Unfortunately, we always have to answer the question negatively. I would like to briefly explain the reasons for this in the following article.

Proofing on publication paper is still technically impossible.

All proofing systems currently certified by Fogra are based on an inkjet printer as a test printer, mostly from Epson, Canon or HP. These printers are characterised by a large colour space, good resolution and excellent homogeneity and colour stability – all characteristics that are absolutely necessary for a proof printing system. The Epson systems used by the majority of proof printers are based on 11-colour pigment inks, which can reproduce a significantly larger colour space than e.g. ISOCoatedV2. However, the prerequisite for this is the use of special papers optimized for inkjet printing, in which the pigments and inks are optimally emphasized. This requires special coatings that are optimized for optimum reproduction, fast drying, good abrasion resistance and high UV stability of the print. On an image printing paper without these coatings, the ink would run, hardly dry and would not be smudge-proof. The color space would also be impossible to achieve. A proof would therefore not be possible from this point of view.

Stamp once on a coated printing paper. You can easily wipe off the stamping ink even after many days. The situation is similar with inkjet inks. And even colour laser printers are no solution. The toner applied to the paper in these systems and then liquefied by heat to bond with the paper cannot penetrate the closed coated surfaces. This means that the print is not fused and the toner can be wiped off the surface directly after printing.

Modern digital printing systems such as the iGen from Xerox are also capable of neatly mapping color spaces such as ISOCoatedV2. Some of these systems are also able to print offset papers properly, although here too special papers optimized for digital printing are used. However, despite major improvements in recent years, these digital printing systems are still not capable of reproducing the small color deviations required for a true color-accurate proof, a “contract proof in accordance with ISO 12647-7”. Even after a complete recalibration and re-profiling on the paper used, these systems only achieve “Validation Print” quality according to ISO 12647-8.

“Validation Prints” are not “contract proofs”, they are not color-binding and not legally binding, since the permissible color deviations of Validation Prints may be significantly higher than those of real proofs. The result would therefore only be a “print”, which is not binding for a print shop as a result, not “color-binding” but only “colored goods”. And it is precisely this commitment that must be achieved with a proof. In addition, the color stability of these systems is predominantly so critical that even with a new profiling in the morning in the afternoon, even the lax validation print tolerances can no longer be achieved and the system again has to be recalibrated and profiled.

The only solution: the classic proof. If it wasn’t for the cost.

Here, real offset printing with real colours produces the real print later in an edition of one piece. Since the proof is printed in real offset printing, production paper can also be used here without any problems. The downside? The price. Depending on the format, a proof on circulation paper costs several hundred euros. Since press proofs are still predominantly film-based printed today, but the real printing is usually via computer-to-plate printing plates, there is no 100% precision of the press proof for the production print today either. CTP is also available from proofing companies, but at an even higher cost. A little postcard, a slim fanfold? This is not economically viable in proof printing.

So don’t use circulation paper for shorter print runs. Especially with ISOCoatedV2, a classic proof offers you true color accuracy and stability at very low costs. Just lay the cover paper next to it. We are sure that this is the best way for you to imagine what the subsequent printing will look like, in the “most colour-accurate” and also at the best price. And in comparison to Validation Print digital printing, it is legally binding and binding in colour.

New packaging at Proof.de

 

Proof.de has introduced new packaging for proofs up to DIN A4+ and from A3.

The new A4+ packaging are made of high quality Chromosulfatcardboard with 450gr/m² weight and provided with a pull tab. They can be fitted on the front either with an adress label and postage stamp or for express shipments with a DHL Express label, as shown in the picture below. For shipping abroad we use to send via world letter large with registered mail, which is now directly printed as an adress label with stamp.

Die neuen Proof Verpackungen von Proof.de: Ab sofort sind Ihre Proofs noch besser geschützt.

The new cardboard shipping sleeves are slightly slimmer than before and also provided with a comfortable pull-tab. The new address labels are easy to recognize as of Proof.de. For the different formats between Proof DIN A3 and DIN A0 + they are available in various lengths and are each used appropriately according Proof size. They are used with DHL shipping labels for the standard shipping and express delivery.

Continue reading

Reproduction of anaglyph images and line drawings

 

Already a few weeks ago we received an unusual request: The musician and aspiring art student Tobias Weh from Osnabrück experimented with line drawings based on anaglyphs and achieved very good results on the monitor. He created superimposed line drawings, which then delivered a different image when viewed through the left eye than when viewed through the right eye. The question was whether this could be reproduced better with the high color range of a proofing system than with a simple domestic inkjet printer.

Since such questions are of course very interesting at first sight, we were quickly prepared to support Mr Weh in his work. To get closer to the matter, we use an i1 Pro 2 and BabelColor Color Translator & Analyzer to measure the spectra for the two films, which are transmitted through standard anaglyph glasses.

Anaglyphenbrille - Durchgelassenes Spektrum der beiden FolienActually a very satisfactory result. By choosing two colours as printing in the spectral ranges of 450 to 500 nanometres for blue and 650 to 700 nanometres for red, it should actually be possible to achieve quite a good result. The first idea was to use the LAB values measured by BabelColor to create the respective red and cyan color in the print. Unfortunately, however, this does not really work; the measured printed colours could unfortunately not be spectrally matched at all with the desired colour.

Anaglyphen-Druck_der_gemessenen_LAB_WerteSo we continued to experiment and found two colors that should actually harmonize very well spectrally with the transmitted spectra of the glasses.

Anaglyphen-Druck: Gewählte Farben für TestBut even here the result of the visual inspection was devastating. A strong ghosting in both colours was permanently predominant, a clear colour separation was not possible. Also a look through the foils of the anaglyph glasses on different Pantone fans in order to find by a visual color selection a color as suitable as possible did not bring any result. In red the glasses worked quite well, in the cyan area none of the Pantone colour fields disappeared even approximately in front of the human eye.

Blick durch die blaue Anaglyphenbrille auf rote Pantone Farben Blick durch die rote Anaglyphenbrille auf rote Pantone Farben

Amazing was also the effect that the Pantone neon colors like the Pantone 811 C delivered visibly brighter color results for the eye and even for a camera than the pure white paper. The two pictures above are snapshots of an iPhone camera through the two filter films of the anaglyph glasses. The red area clearly shows that some Pantone colours disappear completely through the film, while all Pantone colour strips are completely visible in blue.

As the only pragmatic solution we finally developed a compromise: We brightened up the colours red and cyan to prevent ghosting and coloured the background of the paper slightly light grey instead of white. This minimized ghosting, especially in the cyan area, so that the desired visual effect of the anaglyph image was achieved.

Even with intensive research on the Internet, we were unable to produce any other or better result. In several articles by a Frenchman Eric Dubois, the dilemma is quite well outlined, but his results did not really help us with our problem of line representations.

Some important links about anaglyph printing that we stumbled across during our research:

http://www.site.uottawa.ca/~edubois/anaglyph/

https://forums.adobe.com/thread/377398

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anaglyph_3D

Tobias Weh fragte auch im Typografie-Forum nach Erfahrungswerten an.

http://www.typografie.info/3/topic/31883-anaglyphe-bilder-drucken-rot-grün-3d/

But here, too, there was no further evidence of a better approach.

Conclusion: The anaglyph area seems to work very well on screen. This is supported by a large number of Kindle eBook publications, which Amazon sells for little money. This is where the anaglyph effect really works, a high quality monitor is not necessary. However, this high-quality result cannot be reproduced in printing.

The hardcopy books currently available on the market with anaglyph images are mainly filled with historical stereographic images, which are based on a two-colour and thus grey background. This probably has two advantages: The two-tone grey minimizes ghosting, and in historical images our human tolerance threshold is simply higher than in modern photographs or line drawings.

If you have an idea how to produce a ghosting-free anaglyph image with modern printing systems, please contact us. We look forward to receiving further input and feedback on our deliberations.

Proof GmbH: Fogra certified for ISOcoatedv2 (Fogra 39) and PSOUncoated (Fogra 47)

 

Proof GmbH Fogracert Contract Proof Creation 28651The Proof GmbH has again successfully completed Fogra certification for the production of contract proofs – Contract Proof Creation.

The certification proofs have been produced both on EPSON 7900 and EPSON 9900 proof printers with SpectroProofer measuring instruments. Our two proofing papers were included in the certification process. Proof GmbH is therefore certified for the most frequently used Proofing Standards.

Fogra Zertifikat 2014 der Proof GmbH TübingenThe requirements for the Fogra certification go far beyond simply measuring the media wedge. So the proofs are analyzed according to the following criteria:

  • Compliance with the tolerances of the Fogra Media Wedge CMYK 3
  • Determination of color accuracy [ISO 12642-2 test chart], the color gamut and gray balance
  • Gloss measurement in accordance with ISO 8254-1 [TAPPI]
  • Tone value
  • Register and resolution
  • Status information
  • Tone value
  • homogeneity

In parallel to the measurements, control measurements were carried out with a second X-Rite meter in order to eliminate measurement errors.

The conclusion of the Fogra: “The proofs of the company Proof GmbH are as color accurate and binding in the following combinations:

1. Fogra 39 / ISOCoatedV2
Software Fiery XF 5.2.2
Proofing Substrate: EFI Gravure Proof Paper 4245
EPSON Stylus Pro 7900
Fogra 39

2. Fogra 47 / PSOUncoated
Software Fiery XF 5.2.2
Proofing Substrate: EFI Proof Paper 9120 XF matt
Epson Stylus Pro 9900
Fogra 47

The Fogra certification and the full 11-page report from Fogra can be downloaded here::

Fogra certificate 2014 Proof GmbH Tübingen

Fogra certificate 2014 Proof GmbH Tübingen

Full 11-page report of the Fogra Certification of Proof GmbH Tübingen 2014

Full 11-page report of the Fogra Certification of Proof GmbH Tübingen 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PaC.Space Proofs in the shop: New Proof Profile for packaging gravure printing

 

PaC.Space is the first uniform colour standard and proof standard for packaging gravure printing on coated substrates and films. Proofs in the PaC.Space colour space can now be ordered conveniently at shop.proof.de.

Up to now, there have been no colour standards in packaging gravure printing, as it is much more complex than magazine gravure printing, for example, and much larger colour spaces can be achieved in packaging printing. So far, the ISOCoatedV2 color space has often been used, but it contains considerably fewer colors than PaC.Space. Or in-house standards of the packaging printers were used, but they still had to be revised for the final print before the printing process.

With PaC.Space there is now a color space suitable for many packaging gravure prints, with which a proof can be created very early in the design process, which comes very close to the later production result. The data can and should be processed directly in PaC.space, which helps to reduce costs and time.

The idea of a uniform color space is the result of a project of the Pro Gravure Working Group of the European Rotogravure Association (ERA) under the leadership of GMG and Europe’s largest cylinder house Janoschka. At Proof.de PaC.Space Proofs are created according to the following conditions:

PaC.Space
PaC.Space is the first uniform color standard for packaging gravure printing that enables an interface from supplied prepress data to process- or print-specific adjustments.
Profile: PaC.Space_CMYK_engravure_V1a.icc
Paper: Coated substrates and films in packaging gravure printing
Check profile: FOGRA_PaCSpace_MKCheck11.it8

 

 

Color deviation of Pantone metallics and Pantone Premium Metallics color in proofing in Delta-E (∆E)

 

Current proofing systems can print spot colors like Pantone or HKS very accurate. With Fiery XF 5.2 Proof software and the Epson 7900/9900 proof printers we evaluated, with which color deviation PANTONE Metallics Coated and PANTONE Premium Metallics Coated colors can be reproduced in proofing.

The color deviations were calculated based on the measured color space of the proof system of Proof GmbH by the proofing software. Deviations should therefore be quite similar in practice. Almost all PANTONE colors can be simulated quite well in the wide color gamut of the proofer.

The smaller the Delta-E value, the lower is the color distance of the PANTONE reference to the proofed PANTONE color. Higher Delta-E values ​​show, which PANTONE Colors can’t be simulated accurately in the proof.

Please note: Since the proof devices does not have colors with metallic pigments, the metallic shine in the proof can not be reproduced. Only through the satin finish of our proofing paper a somewhat shiny effect is produced, which replaces partly the metallic luster of true PANTONE colors. Although the color is well rendered, the metallic effect in the proof does not exist. The proof can therefore always be used only as a guide, but not as binding simulation of the final result.

PANTONE Metallics
Coated
Delta-E Deviation
Proof
PANTONE
Premium Metallics Coated
Delta E
Deviation
Proof
PANTONE 871 C 0,71 ∆E PANTONE 10101 C 1,49 ∆E
PANTONE 872 C 0,72 ∆E PANTONE 10102 C 1,77 ∆E
PANTONE 873 C 1,03 ∆E PANTONE 10103 C 1,00 ∆E
PANTONE 874 C 1,26 ∆E PANTONE 10104 C 1,42 ∆E
PANTONE 875 C 0,97 ∆E PANTONE 10105 C 1,42 ∆E
PANTONE 876 C 0,86 ∆E PANTONE Silver C 1,65 ∆E
PANTONE 877 C 1,37 ∆E PANTONE 10106 C 1,09 ∆E
PANTONE 8001 C 1,52 ∆E PANTONE 10107 C 0,97 ∆E Continue reading

The names of the 84 new PANTONE Colors 2014

 

The following 84 PANTONE colors were added in February 2014 to the PANTONE Matching System and are included in the current Pantone Plus

PANTONE 2337 | PANTONE 2338 | PANTONE 2339 | PANTONE 2340
PANTONE 2341 | PANTONE 2342 | PANTONE 2343 | PANTONE 2344
PANTONE 2345 | PANTONE 2346 | PANTONE 2347 | PANTONE 2348
PANTONE 2349 | PANTONE 2350 | PANTONE 2351 | PANTONE 2352
PANTONE 2353 | PANTONE 2354 | PANTONE 2355 | PANTONE 2356
PANTONE 2357 | PANTONE 2358 | PANTONE 2359 | PANTONE 2360
PANTONE 2361 | PANTONE 2362 | PANTONE 2363 | PANTONE 2364
PANTONE 2366 | PANTONE 2367 | PANTONE 2368 | PANTONE 2369
PANTONE 2370 | PANTONE 2371 | PANTONE 2372 | PANTONE 2373
PANTONE 2374 | PANTONE 2376 | PANTONE 2377 | PANTONE 2378
PANTONE 2379 | PANTONE 2380 | PANTONE 2381 | PANTONE 2382
PANTONE 2383 | PANTONE 2384 | PANTONE 2386 | PANTONE 2387
PANTONE 2388 | PANTONE 2389 | PANTONE 2390 | PANTONE 2391
PANTONE 2392 | PANTONE 2393 | PANTONE 2394 | PANTONE 2396
PANTONE 2397 | PANTONE 2398 | PANTONE 2399 | PANTONE 2400
PANTONE 2401 | PANTONE 2402 | PANTONE 2403 | PANTONE 2404
PANTONE 2406 | PANTONE 2407 | PANTONE 2408 | PANTONE 2409
PANTONE 2410 | PANTONE 2411 | PANTONE 2412 | PANTONE 2413
PANTONE 2414 | PANTONE 2416 | PANTONE 2417 | PANTONE 2418
PANTONE 2419 | PANTONE 2420 | PANTONE 2421 | PANTONE 2422
PANTONE 2423 | PANTONE 2424 | PANTONE 2426 | PANTONE 2427

The following six PANTONE colors are dispensed compared to PANTONE 50th Anniversary compartments of 2012:

PANTONE Medium Yellow | PANTONE Bright orange | Red PANTONE STRONG
PANTONE Medium Blue | PANTONE Bright Green | PANTONE Neutral Black

Pantone Color Chaos 2014: 84 new Pantone Plus color Pantone annoy users

 

Pantone has added a further 84 colors to ist Pantone Plus color palette in March 2014. The the total amount of the Pantone Plus color now extends to 1755 colors as Pantone writes on his website. The colors were – matching the Pantone color of the year: Radiant Orchid – expanded in the Rouge and Pink range, based on the previous base colors.

Two other changes compared to the previous 50th Anniversary PANTONE guides are visible:

  • The cover sheets have been redesigned
  • The order of color arrangement has now changed by going to chromatic criteria and now corresponds to the chromatically correct order. The colors from 2010 and 2012 have now been logically integrated into the new color fans.

For the CMYK guides and the Premium Metallics and Neons & pastel color guides only the cover pages have been updated. Graphic artists and the printing industry should forthwith upgrade its Solid Coated and Solid Uncoated guides to those of 2014 or newer.

Customers are annoyed by Pantone Product Policy

Since the year 2010, there has been chaos in the PANTONE Plus color portfolio, which is not improved by the new color guides generation. At present, there are four parallel Pantone Plus color guides on the market, three of them with different number of colors included in the guide, although that is hardly communicated by Pantone.

The same is true for the Pantone product partners such as Adobe: Hardly any graphic designer knows what Pantone Plus color are integrated into Adobe the specific Version since neither Pantone nor Adobe characterize their color guide generation different. Pantone’s statement: “Compatible with today’s digital workflows – colors can be easily updated in leading design applications” translates rather: “What Pantone colors you see in your application, is pure cuincidence – depending on the update status and your manual intervention.”

Continue reading

Color differences of Pantone Solid Coated and Pantone Solid Uncoated color in proofing in Delta-E (∆E)

 

Current proofing systems can print spot colors like Pantone or HKS very accurate. With Fiery XF 5.2 Proof software and the Epson 7900/9900 proof printers we evaluated, with which color deviation PANTONE Solid Coated and PANTONE Solid Uncoated colors can be reproduced in proofing.

The color deviations were calculated based on the measured color space of the proof system of Proof GmbH by the proofing software. Deviations should therefore be quite similar in practice. Almost all PANTONE colors can be simulated quite well in the wide color gamut of the proofer.

The smaller the Delta-E value, the lower is the color distance of the PANTONE reference to the proofed PANTONE color. Higher Delta-E values ​​show, which PANTONE Colors can’t be simulated accurately in the proof.

Pantone Farbe
Solid Coated
Farbabweichung im Proof in
Delta-E (∆E)
  Pantone Farbe
Solid Uncoated
Farbabweichung im Proof in
Delta-E (∆E)
PANTONE 100 C 0.89 ∆E PANTONE 100 U 1.69 ∆E
PANTONE 101 C 0.60 ∆E PANTONE 101 U 1.62 ∆E
PANTONE 102 C 1.23 ∆E PANTONE 102 U 1.40 ∆E
PANTONE 103 C 0.72 ∆E PANTONE 103 U 0.49 ∆E
PANTONE 104 C 0.48 ∆E PANTONE 104 U 0.92 ∆E
PANTONE 105 C 0.80 ∆E PANTONE 105 U 1.07 ∆E Continue reading

Easy conversion of Pantone – HKS – CMYK – RGB with Adobe Photoshop

 

Farbbücher Auswahl in Adobe Photoshop CC: HKS, Pantone, CMYK und vieles mehr

More often the question arises as to what kind of Pantone colour corresponds to the HKS 43 K. Or what CMYK value? And what kind of web color in RGB?

If you own Adobe Photoshop, you can do these conversions directly there. In Photoshop CC all well-known color books are stored with values.

Let’s assume we are looking for the Pantone equivalent and the matching CMYK color of HKS 43 K.

1: Open the color palette in Adobe Photoshop and select HKS K as the book and then the color HKS 43 K. All well-known colour books are directly stored in Photoshop.

Farbauswahl von HKS 43 K im Buch HKS K in Adobe Photoshop CCThe color corresponds to a Lab value of 26/29/-79 and a CMYK value is already stored here. Simply select the book HKS K Process: Continue reading

Proof for Improved Newsprint (INP), Fogra 48

 

The default was:

“We need a proof for improved newsprint, white’76.”
“Do you know the proof profile?”
“No, unfortunately not. Can’t you decide that?”

We have looked into this question: UPM EcoPrime 76 H is printed on web offset paper in a large print shop. The information of the customer service there was:

“The default profile is Fogra 42, PSO SNP Paper (ECI) but that doesn’t fit at the back and front, is much too gray. “Proof according to Fogra 40, SC Paper (ECI), that’s much better.”

The two profiles do not match at all. SC Paper is for super-calendered paper, PSO SNP Paper for standard newsprint.. And the dot gain curves also differ completely.

Fogra informed us on request that it considers both profiles to be unsuitable. From their point of view, the proof would be better with Fogra 48, Improved Newsprint INP. You would deduce that without exact knowledge of the paper on the basis of our information. She writes that she would “also advise FOGRA48. The print shop, for its part, must comply with the associated target values for solid inking and dot gain”.

However, it seems reasonable to assume that the print shop – without knowing about Fogra 48 or bringing the profile into the discussion – will not know anything about the appropriate target values and will certainly not print according to Fogra 48.

The conclusion: Despite great efforts, no binding profile can be determined for the proof on improved newsprint in this case. And so it remains for customers and service providers to choose between three paths that all three are wrong:

  • The profile specification of the paper manufacturer: Fogra 42
  • Possibly correct: solid colouring and dot gain.
  • Definitely wrong: white point and colour impression
  • The print shop’s recommendation: Fogra 40
  • Visually probably better, if by no means correct: white dot and color appearance
  • Definitely wrong: Paper type
  • The data of Fogra: Fogra 48
  • Possibly correct: white dot and paper
  • Definitely wrong: solid inking and dot gain due to lack of knowledge of the print shop
  • and therefore probably incorrect print settings

Fogra 42, Fogra 40 and Fogra 48 in comparison:

pso_snp_paper

sc_paper

pso_inp_paper

 

 

 

 

 

The Paper: UPM EcoPrime 76 H

eco-prime_paper

 

Create EAN / GTIN codes: Tips for graphic artists

 

EAN codes are standard on every product today. While in the good old days, shopowners themselves typed the prices into a cash register by hand, today scanner cash registers are the rule, which scan standardized EAN codes with a laser and thus clearly recognize the article and add it to the receipt.

EAN, by the way, stands for “European Article Number” and was replaced in 2009 by the global GTIN, “Global Trade Item Number”. The EAN or GTIN is a barcode that can be read automatically and read by barcode readers.

For graphic designers in Europe, two standards from the almost infinite number of EAN codes in use worldwide are primarily important in the product area. EAN 13 and EAN 8, i.e. a barcode of either 13 or 8 digits. What do these numbers actually mean?

Continue reading

How exactly can printing ink be measured?

 

For some years now, the possibilities of colorimetric measurement of printing inks have become simpler and cheaper. And so it is often believed that measuring printing inks is simple, inexpensive and, above all, highly accurate. And this also across a wide variety of brands and generations of measuring devices. Is that true?

If you look at a few studies, that does not necessarily seem to be the case. IFRA, for example, requires that when measuring BCRA ceramic tiles the colour differences between different measuring instruments should be below Delta-E 0.3. In reality, however, things looked different. In a Nussbaum study, 8 out of 9 measurements were for a Delta-E greater than 2.0; in a Wyble & Rich study, the deviations were between Delta-E 0.76 and 1.68. But why are the deviations so large?

On the one hand, the measuring instruments differ in the way they illuminate the surfaces to be measured. This is important in two respects: On the one hand, measurements can vary greatly depending on the material, for example, because light is emitted and measured from only one light source onto the measuring surface. If a measuring instrument has only one lamp, which, for example, radiates at an angle of 45 degrees onto the measuring surface and whose reflection is measured, then the measurement can deviate by up to Delta-E 3.0 if you only rotate the measuring instrument about its own axis. If a left-handed person and a right-handed person measure the same tiles with the same measuring device, then just by holding the measuring device differently and by the different lighting angles of the tiles a measurement can be completely different.

The solution for this: In a measuring device, several light sources are distributed or, in the best case, the illumination is emitted directly circular at an angle of 45 degrees in order to minimize such effects.

Continue reading

Order Proofs: shop.proof.de is online

 

shop_proof

From now on you can conveniently order proofs at shop.proof.de:

At shop.proof.de is available under shop.proof.de a comfortable online shop with numerous benefits available:

  • Convenient Data Upload: Each item one or more files can now be uploaded. So you can assign your data directly to the individual proofs.
  • Payment by Paypal, direct debit, invoice etc .: You are on shop.proof.de with Paypal and direct debit payment methods more available. Of course you can continue to conveniently order proofs on invoice.
  • See Previous orders, invoices, data uploads: You can always check your previous orders, call the invoices to and check the files uploaded.

Layout in RGB, print in CMYK. Problems?

 

Especially in larger companies today the layout in RGB is the rule rather than the exception. The advantages are obvious:

  • The layout takes place in a large, almost media-neutral color space
  • All Photoshop filters are available without restrictions
  • The process of color space conversion to CMYK is shifted to the production process as late as possible

In practice, however, there are two potential problems in particular.

Problem 1: CMYK conversion in the last step.
The catalogue is designed in InDesign, all data is perfectly matched, the last step before printing and proofing is the export to a printable PDF in CMYK. Usually this is done via a preset in InDesign, which defines the exact specifications for the color space conversion. In practice, however, this color space transfer can hardly be monitored. The problem: Even if you check the color values in Acrobat in the exported PDF file, for example, Acrobat does not really display the colors it contains. Acrobat brav would show you CMYK values even if the RGB images are still wrongly contained. However, other CMYK values can occur during printing when the data is processed again. Lately it looked like this:
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PDF/X4 – The future of PDF/X?

 

The PDF/X4 standard, a new PDF specification for PDF export, has already been available for several years. But what are the advantages of PDF/X4?

Users from the print sector have known the ISO PDF-X standards for many years. If the name PDF stands for “Portable Document Format”, i.e. the portable and thus transferable document, PDF “X” is a version specialized for “eXchange”, i.e. the exchange of PDF files. In concrete terms, this means that many of the functions that a PDF file can potentially display (form fields, calculations, 3D elements, films, etc.) but which cannot be controlled in print are prohibited in PDF/X in order to ensure secure data exchange.

While PDF/X2 hardly came into its own, PDF/X1a and /X3 are still the standards for the printing industry today; almost all online printers such as Flyeralarm etc. demand PDF files in the PDF/X-3 standard. Why? The PDF/X-1 and PDF/X-3 files offer many advantages to printers: Instead of open data from Quark XPress or Adobe InDesign, the PDF significantly reduces the workload for print shops. No native software is necessary, no fonts, no image links… all this used to cost time and money. And to round off the PDF, the X was added, which stood for production reliability, since only those things were allowed to be used in the PDF that could also be safely exposed and printed.

However, one of the biggest disadvantages of PDF/X-1 and /X-3 so far has been the lack of transparency:

  • Pictures were broken down into many small tiles, and were therefore no longer editable afterwards
  • Text was partially converted to paths if it was below transparent area, the editability of the PDF file was also obsolete here
  • Customers complained about the white lines in the PDF, a display error in Adobe Acrobat based on the tiling of lines.
  • The transparency reduction color space, i.e. the color space into which the transparencies were converted during PDF export, could only be set globally. Either CMYK or RGB. A media-neutral workflow was therefore no longer possible.

However, the new PDF/X-4 standard (ISO 15930-7) has also been available for several years. The PDF/X-4 standard can be used as of PDF 1.5 and also allows transparency, for example, so transparency reduction is no longer absolutely necessary. The PDF file becomes slimmer, images are no longer tiled and therefore also well represented and latest changes in the PDF file are possible for both images and texts. Since text also remains text, the full text search for PDF files is possible at any time. And: Due to the availability of Lab, RGB and CMYK data and the elimination of transparency reduction, a media-neutral workflow with all common color spaces plus spot colors is also possible.

PDF creation has also been simplified in recent years. Due to the elimination of the postscript intermediate stage with subsequent processing via Acrobat Distiller, PDF files can already be generated directly in the layout programs for a long time. And that again causes the omission of PPD files and much more.

Since InDesign CS3, PDF/X-4 documents can also be created here. Since version CS 5.5 ff the current PDF/X-4:2010 specification is also available. This means that the current standards of PDF/X-4 and PDF/X-4p are each based on the PDF 1.6 standard. PDF/X4-p refers to external color profiles, contains all data, the file is called PDF/X4, which has increasingly established itself as the standard and has also been demanded as PDF/X standard in the final examinations for media designers for three years. PDF/X-4 supports color management, Lab, CMYK, RGB, grayscale and spot colors. Transparencies and JPEG 2000, 16-bit data and OpenType fonts are also allowed.

PDF/X-4 actually does much better than the previous standards. And so it is only a question of time when PDF/X-4 will also become widely accepted. Simple and precise creation of PDF/X-4 files is now standard in Adobe InDesign or Quark XPress.

With all the advantages of the X-4 standard, however, the disadvantages should not be concealed

The more color spaces are possible besides CMYK in a PDF file, the more responsibility for the correctness of the data lies with the creator of the PDF, the designer. If you could be sure with the very secure PDF/X-1a printing standard that all data was in CMYK and flattened and that the result is displayed in Acrobat, which will later also be generated in print, then PDF/X-4 is no longer so secure. How many color spaces are included? Are they all correctly marked? Is the output color space correct? Are the transparencies reduced correctly?

Many software manufacturers have promised PDF/X-4 compatibility, e.g. for their RIP software… but only promised. Sometimes, the transparency reduction in the RIP results in bizarre cases, as in this example. In another concrete case from our practice, an RGB black area behind numerous CMYK layers, which should never have been printed to the best of our knowledge and belief, confused the images above it, which were transparently cleared via alpha channel, in such a way that the entire print tore off in a rectangle instead of running out softly on black. And: if the output color space of a PDF/X-4 proof file does not match the ordered proof profile, we cannot reliably proof the file correctly. Instead, we issue a “Data incorrect” message asking you to revise the file with the correct output color space.

This means that the three most important PDF/X color spaces will continue to exist in parallel for a long time to come: PDF/X-1a as the safest printing standard, PDF/X-3 as the most common and PDF/X-4 as the most flexible, but also most sensitive and “responsible” of the three.

The proof is much darker than the image on my monitor. Why?

 

Customers are often unsettled when they hold a proof in their hands. “The proof of the picture is much darker than the picture on my monitor. Why is that so? And what do I do now?”

There are many possible reasons for a deviation between the proof and, for example, the monitor display:

  • The monitor is not calibrated
    Only calibrated monitors can accurately display color. When I buy a cheap monitor and connect it to my computer, I definitely can’t see any real color. As a rule of thumb, only a hardware-calibrated monitor has a chance for correct color.
  • The monitor is calibrated, but the colors look different
    A monitor below 1,000 Euro cannot usually be calibrated to good color representation for the standard color space ISOCoated V2, because it has a too small color gamut. Only real proof monitors are also designed and suitable for the display of proofable colors.
  • The proof is not viewed under D50 standard light
    Especially in winter the lighting conditions are often poor. And incandescent lamps, energy-saving lamps and conventional neon tubes only provide very poor colour reproduction. Without a D50 light source, a proof cannot be evaluated.
  • The color settings in the software are wrong
    Often the image editing software like Photoshop is simply installed and used without adjustments. The selected color profiles often do not correspond to the profiles used for proofing. Apple-Shift-K for Macintosh and Control-Shift-K for Windows show you your profile settings in Photoshop.

In general, no patent remedy can be given for the correct display of proofs for the monitor. However, if a proof is provided with UGRA/Fogra media wedge CMYK V3.0 and test report, the chances are high that it reproduces the required colors very precisely. If your monitor image does not correspond to the proof, the error usually lies with you. The list of causes above can help you in troubleshooting.

My customer wants to print on a tin can. Pantone? CMYK? Can this be simulated in the proof?

 

Requests such as the proof of a printed tin can often reach us. Why can’t such a printed can be “proofed”?

A proof is a standardized product. Take the classic ISOCoatedV2 proof, for example; the standard proof for coated printing paper. Here is the definition in brief:

“Paper type 1 and 2, glossy and matt coated paper, dot gain curves A (CMY) and B (K) from ISO 12647-2:2004” (Source: farbproofs.de)

Metal is printed with a varnish. Neither the colour of the metal of the tin can nor the colour of the lacquer is clearly defined, nor the thickness of the lacquer application and the printing process in which the lacquer is applied (digital print / screen printing, pad printing etc.) is defined.

A contract proof refers to very tight tolerances and precisely defined framework conditions. This includes not only the densitometric and colorimetric reference of the printing ink, but also, for example, the paper white, which is simulated very precisely in the proof. For exactly this reason there is no proof for recycled paper: The papers and paper whites are simply so different that no uniform, standardized “color” of a recycled paper can be defined. From classic recycled paper with a neutral grey or yellowish-grey colouring to de-inked, almost white recycled papers, everything is available on the market. Just not by default.

Therefore, a proof always refers to offset or gravure printing under standardized conditions. Changed surfaces such as metal or changed paper colours such as recycled or high-quality image papers with inclusions or printing on coloured papers have not yet been standardised and therefore cannot be proofed.